The Legends

Take a look at our list of Legends.

We’ll be updating this list frequently so make sure you check back often!

Nicola Browne

Nicola Browne

New Zealand

Full name Nicola Jane Browne
Major teams New Zealand Women, Northern Districts Women
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

Nicola Browne is a genuine pace bowler who gets good lift from her 180cm height. Her ability to take early wickets makes her a potent force as an opening bowler. Browne’s talent was apparent in her progression through the age groups, resulting in her selection for the 2002-03 A tour of Australia after being part of the New Zealand Cricket Academy intake. She had debuted for the White Ferns in the 2001-02 Rosebowl Series and was subsequently selected for the winter tour to Europe. In her latest outing for her country, against India in the ODI series (2006), Browne contributed solidly with both ball and bat, helping her country to a 4-1 series victory.

ShaneCortese

Shane Cortese

New Zealand

Full Name: Shane Cortese
Major Team: The Lords Taverners
Batting Style:  Left Hand, Style of Gower in his Prime,. Execution of Danny Morrison in his prime
Bowling Style: Used to be Right Arm, Lightening Quick, Move them Both ways in the air and off the wicket, now right hand tweakers lucky to land them, perfect for 20/20 Cricket and audience participation.

I’ve played cricket all my life, from Northern Districts age group teams, to captaining The Lords Taverners at Arundal and the Oval to the Mighty Grafton Presidents. While playing with The Taverners I met and played with some amazing cricketers, Sir Garfield , Lord Cowdrey, Mike Denness, Clive Radley, Geoff Howarth, John Snow to name a few.

One of my most memorable times was in Norwich when I turned up to be told I was opening the bowling and my opening partner was sitting in the corner. Incredibly skinny, dark and hidden behind a ‘Best Bets” was none other than “Whispering Death”. We went outside where we had a warm up by bowling a few to each other as you do, I couldn’t actually believe it. He then came up and ASKED ME what end I wanted, “Any end you don’t want Michael would be fine by me” I replied, Fine he said in his deep west Indian Accent ‘I’ll take the wind”! I then sat back and watched Michael Holding come in off 30 paces. It was beautiful, bowled about 30kms an hour and hurt his hamstring but it was still beautiful!

MarcEllis

Marc Ellis

New Zealand

Full Name: Marc Ellis
Major Teams: All Blacks (Rugby), New Zealand Warriors (Rugby League)

Marc Ellis is a New Zealand businessman and television presenter, and former rugby league and rugby union player. During the 1995 Rugby World Cup he scored six tries in the game against Japan, which is the record for the most tries by an individual in a Rugby World Cup match.

EvanGray

Evan Gray

New Zealand

Full name: Evan John Gray
Major teams: New Zealand, Wellington
Batting style: Right-hand bat
Bowling style: Slow left-arm orthodox

Evan John Gray (born 18 November 1954 in Wellington) is a former New Zealand cricketer, who played 10 Tests and 10 One Day Internationals for New Zealand in the 1980s. He was selected as a specialist bowler with 17 wickets at a bowling average of 52.11. In 1981-82 he and Ross Ormiston added 226 for Wellington against Central Districts.

Mark Greatbatch Crop

Mark Greatbatch

New Zealand

Full Name: Mark John Greatbatch
Major Teams: New Zealand, Auckland, Central Districts
Batting Style: Left-hand bat
Bowling Style: Right-arm medium
Fielding Position: Wicketkeeper

A beefy and charismatic left-hander, Mark Greatbatch was a solid batsman at Test level but in limited-overs cricket he could be a different character and was one of the first one-day pinch hitters.

He learnt his trade in the leagues of New Zealand and England, and ground out an unusually dogged hundred on his Test debut against England in 1987-88, and again at Perth in 1989-90, when he staved off what looked to be certain Australian victory, making an unbeaten 146. He started the 1990 tour of England with hundreds in successive one-day internationals, but his form thereafter was patchy.

At the 1992 World Cup he was left out of New Zealand’s opening two matches, but thereafter was instrumental in their success and ended with 313 runs at 44.71. He followed with another Test hundred against Pakistan, but a loss of form, especially against the short ball, and a new national captain-coach team led to him being sidelined.

A fine fielder, he took some spectacular catches, usually in the slips. On retiring in 1998, he became Central Districts’ coaching director and then coach, but at the end of 2003-04 he quit New Zealand, frustrated with salaries and opportunities, and took over as coach of Giggleswick School in Yorkshire.

In 2005 he moved to Warwickshire to head up their academy, and at the end of the summer was appointed as county coach on a three-year contract. Greatbatch did not complete his term with the club, and after leaving in 2007 he was appointed as an advisor to New Zealand’s selection panel. That role, and a mini crisis after Andy Moles abruptly departed from the head coach’s role in late 2008, saw Greatbatch take over in January 2010.

Chris Harris Crop

Chris Harris

New Zealand

Full Name: Chris Zinzan Harris
Major Teams: New Zealand, Canterbury, Derbyshire,Gloucestershire, Hyderabad Heroes, ICL World XI,Marylebone Cricket Club, Mountaineers, Southern Rocks
Also known as: Lugs
Playing Role: Allrounder
Batting Style: Left-hand bat
Bowling Style: Right-arm medium

A cult hero in New Zealand cricket and, for a time, one of the most effective allround limited-overs cricketers in the international game, Chris Harris will be remembered as much for his versatile accumulation with the bat as for his nagging slow-medium wobblers.

Harris’s ability to score all round the wicket, pick the gaps and hit boundaries at just the right time turned him into New Zealand’s answer to Michael Bevan, and his 62 not-outs in one-day cricket testify to his ability to close out an innings. His bowling was ideally suited to the shorter game – a gentle medium-pace that forces the batsman to do all the work allied to subtle changes in pace and the ability to cut the ball either way off the wicket. Harris was also a very safe fielder, particularly within the inner circle and in the covers.

He hit a purple patch with the bat in late 1997, going 19 consecutive innings (eight of them in ODIs) without being dismissed and registering three half-centuries. He also played a vital role in New Zealand’s triumph at the ICC KnockOut tournament, putting together a partnership of 122 for the sixth wicket with Chris Cairns to set up a last-over win against India in the final.

In 2004, Harris became the first New Zealand player to have played 250 ODIs, although a shoulder injury marred his 250th, and final, appearance. He also remains New Zealand’s second-highest wicket-taker in one-dayers, behind Daniel Vettori.

Adam Hollioake

Adam Hollioake

Rest of the World

Full name Adam John Hollioake
Major teams England, Essex, Surrey
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium

What Adam Hollioake lacked in ability, he made up for with attitude. He was a natural leader, encouraged his Surrey side to get up the opposition’s noses, and relished a scrap. His batting was more artisan than artiste but he was strong square of the wicket and possessed a tasty cover-drive. As a seamer he was more effective in the one-day game, where his hard-to-pick knuckle ball fooled batsmen into playing too early. He shone with the bat in the one-day games against the 1997 Australians – even breaking into the Test team – and later that year inherited the captaincy of England’s one-day side from Mike Atherton, who continued to lead in the Tests. It was an unprecedented but initially successful move as Hollioake’s inexperienced squad lifted the Akai Singer Champions Trophy in Sharjah. But defeats in West Indies and at home to South Africa cost Hollioake his job. His England career appeared to be over when he was dropped after the disastrous 1999 World Cup, but was back in the selectors’ thoughts ahead of the 2003 tournament. By then, however, he had suffered the heartbreak of seeing his talented younger brother, Ben, die in a car accident. Adam returned from an enforced break a more mature character and, sometimes batting like a man possessed, lifted Surrey to a poignant third Championship title in four years. At the end of the 2003 season, he embarked on a sponsored walk, cycle and sail from Scotland to Morocco to raise money for the Ben Hollioake Memorial Fund, and announced his intention to retire at the end of 2004. He came back for one match, in 2005, when he took a hat-trick in a fundraiser, and then in 2007 made an unexpected – and largely unsuccessful – return to Twenty20 cricket, playing for Essex.

ErvinMcSweeney

Ervin McSweeney

New Zealand

Full name: Ervin Bruce McSweeney
Major teams: New Zealand, Central Districts, Wellington
Batting style: Right-hand bat
Fielding position: Wicketkeeper

Ervin Bruce McSweeney (born 8 March 1957 in Wellington) is a New Zealand cricketer. He played 16 One Day Internationals in the 1980s in Richard Hadlee’s team as a wicketkeeper-batsman but he never played in a Test match.

He toured Zimbabwe with a Young New Zealand team in 1984-85, and with the New Zealand senior team he toured Australia in 1985-86 and Sri Lanka in 1986-87, and played in the Austral-Asia one-day series in Sharjah in 1985-86.

McSweeney played first-class cricket between 1979-80 and 1993-94 for Central Districts and Wellington. His top score was 205 not out for Wellington against Central Districts in 1987-88, when he added 341 for the fifth wicket with Gavin Larsen. He captained Wellington in 1982-83 and 1983-84, and from 1988-89 to 1990-91. He also played for Hawke’s Bay in the Hawke Cup.

He later became Chief Executive of Cricket Wellington, and announced his resignation from that position on 31 August 2007.

Dion Nash 2 Crop

Dion Nash

New Zealand

Full Name: Dion Joseph Nash
Major Teams: New Zealand, Auckland, Middlesex, Northern Districts, Otago
Playing Role: Bowler
Batting Style: Right-hand bat
Bowling Style: Right-arm fast-medium
Current field of expertise: Men’s grooming products
Native Habitat: Inner city Auckland after being raised in the wild northern town of Dargaville

Still known to bowl full pace to children in beach cricket and as the bat flies out of their hands exclaim “they love it when I do that”.

Dion Nash, a solidly-built right-hander, burst onto the international scene with 11 wickets and a half-century in his fifth Test and his first at Lord’s in 1994. But a series of back injuries so interrupted Nash’s progress that what looked like being a stirring career as allrounder and captain was cut off in its prime.

When Stephen Fleming was injured during the 1998-99 home season Nash took over the captaincy against South Africa, and while the Test series was lost, Nash’s aggressive on-field leadership impressed those critics who found Fleming’s captaincy style too laid-back.

The New Zealand team has also lacked Nash’s hard-minded attitude: he was never afraid to assert his rights in the middle. His favourite and most spectacular stroke was the straight-drive, although as injuries restricted his footwork, he developed a muscular back foot drive through the covers. He finally retired from international cricket after the 2001-02 season, and in June 2005 he was named as one of New Zealand’s national selectors

Matthew Sinclair

Mathew Sinclair

New Zealand

Full name Mathew Stuart Sinclair
Major teams New Zealand, Central Districts
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm medium
Fielding position Wicketkeeper

If ever the weight of two double-centuries scored so early in an international career – two in the first 12 Tests – has become a yoke, then that is the case for Mathew Sinclair. He scored 214 on his debut, against West Indies at Wellington in 1999, and followed that with 204 not out against Pakistan in the following summer. But despite this most promising of starts, Sinclair has struggled to gain a permanent place in both the Test and one-day sides after disappointing scores. He was recalled for the third Test against South Africa at Wellington in March 2004, but an impressive 74 in the first innings wasn’t enough to get him picked on the tour of England in 2004. However, after Craig McMillan broke his finger in a tour match against Leicestershire, Sinclair, who was playing league cricket in East Anglia, was called up as cover. Similarly, Sinclair was drafted into the Bangladesh touring squad when Michael Papps dislocated his shoulder, and he duly struck 76 in the first Test.

IanSmith

Ian Smith

New Zealand

Full name Ian David Stockley Smith
Major teams New Zealand, Auckland, Central Districts
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm bowler
Fielding position Wicketkeeper
Other Commentator

You won’t see Ian donning the wicketkeepers gloves at the Legends of Cricket Art Deco Match but he’ll be making a special appearance on the sidelines!

A compact and efficient wicketkeeper, and a dogged late-order batsman, Ian Smith succeeded Warren Lees in the New Zealand side in Australia in 1980-81 and aside from a prolonged absence through injury in 1981-82, was a regular for more than a decade thereafter. His finest hour came at Auckland in 1990-91 when, arriving at the crease with New Zealand on 131 for 7 against India, he cracked a remarkable 173 off 136 balls including 24 off one over from Atul Wassan. It was the highest score by a Test No. 9. In 1991-92 he held seven catches in an innings against Sri Lanka, retiring after the World Cup that same season. He moved effortlessly into the commentary box and now travels the world in that capacity.

Jeff Thomson

Jeff Thomson

Rest of the World

Full name Jeffrey Robert Thomson
Current age 64 years 178 days
Major teams Australia, Middlesex, New South Wales,Queensland
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm fast
Other Commentator

Jeff Thomson was one of the fastest bowlers to have played Test cricket. With an unusual slinging action, and an aggressive approach, he was a fearsome sight to batsmen. He debuted against Pakistan in 1972-73, but hampered by a broken bone in his foot (which he hid from the selectors) was ineffective. Recalled in 1974-5, and forming a partnership with Dennis Lillee, he terrorised the England tourists with consistent spells of extreme fast bowling, taking 33 wickets in the series. He adapted his methods, relying less on pure pace, and more on an excellent cutter, and seam and swing. He was always capable of unleashing a very fast bouncer that would skid and follow the batsman from only just short of a length. He remained with the Australian side when many left to join the Packer circus in 1977, and carried their attack through two series against England and India, but left to join WSC shortly afterwards. A capable fielder, and a lower order batsman who could hit, he was frequently heard on radio commentary during the 1997 Ashes series.

Shane Thomson

Shane Thomson

New Zealand

Full name Shane Alexander Thomson
Major teams New Zealand, Northern Districts
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm slow-medium, Right-arm offbreak

Shane Thomson enjoyed at seven-year, 19-Test career with the New Zealand BlackCaps. His finest hour was the thrilling unbeaten 120 in a memorable run-chase against Pakistan at Christchurch in 1993-94. Shane retired from first-class cricket in 1997 following the 1996 World Cup.

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